Jan 14, 2020 8:05 PM

Russell Stover to cut jobs in some areas, add jobs in Kansas

Posted Jan 14, 2020 8:05 PM

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Russell Stover Chocolates plans to close some facilities and stores nationwide but the expected loss of about 400 jobs will be offset by new jobs resulting from expansion in other areas, the company announced Tuesday.

The company will close distribution and fulfillment centers in Butler, Missouri, and Cookeville, Tennessee, with work from the Tennessee plant moving to a plant in Corsicana, Texas.

The candy maker plans to add a total of 300 jobs at plants in Corsicana, as well as in Iola and Abilene, Kansas.

A plant in Montrose, Colorado, will be closed in 2021, which will increase the workload at the two Kansas plants, according to a company statement. Russell Stover also plans to close some low-traffic stores during the next year but it did not specify where those stores were located.

The changes are part of a consolidation effort begun in 2018, four years after the Kansas City-based company was purchased by Lindt & Sprungli of Switzerland.

Russell Stover had a “strong” fiscal year in 2019 but must adapt to changing tastes and preferences, CEO Andy Deister said.

“Just as consumers change their preferred flavor or package, they’re changing the way they shop for our products, and we’re making sure we have the infrastructure to deliver on their expectations,” Deister said.

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Jan 14, 2020 8:05 PM
Kansas man asks judge for sword battle with ex-wife, lawyer
Courthouse Shelby Iowa google image

HARLAN, Iowa (AP) — A Kansas man has asked an Iowa judge to let him engage in a sword fight with his ex-wife and her attorney so that he can “rend their souls” from their bodies.

David Ostrom, 40, of Paola, Kansas, said in a Jan. 3 court filing that his former wife, Bridgette Ostrom, 38, of Harlan, Iowa, and her attorney, Matthew Hudson, had “destroyed (him) legally.” The Ostroms have been embroiled in disputes over custody and visitation issues and property tax payments.

The judge had the power to let the parties “resolve our disputes on the field of battle, legally," David Ostrom said, adding in his filing that trial by combat "has never been explicitly banned or restricted as a right in these United States."

He also asked the judge for 12 weeks' time so he could secure Japanese samurai swords.

His motion filed in Shelby County District Court stemmed from his frustrations with his ex-wife's attorney, Ostrom told The Des Moines Register.

"I think I've met Mr. Hudson's absurdity with my own absurdity," Ostrom said, adding that his former wife could choose Hudson to act as her champion.